Recent Articles

Mosasaurus Takes A Huge Bite In New Jurassic World Photo

| April 18, 2015 | 0 Comments




With the new Jurassic World trailer just a couple days away, director Colin Trevorrow has been teasing fans with fun new posters in anticipation, and today the director showed us just what it means for a Mosasaurus to snack.

Visit link:

Mosasaurus Takes A Huge Bite In New Jurassic World Photo

Royal Navy sailors charged with sexual assault during party at Canadian military base

| April 18, 2015 | 0 Comments




Four Royal Navy sailors are being held in connection with an alleged sexual assault on a civilian woman at a military base in Shearwater, near Halifax, Nova Scotia.

More – 

Royal Navy sailors charged with sexual assault during party at Canadian military base

The 17 hottest tech startups in France

| April 18, 2015 | 0 Comments



France has built a vibrant tech culture in the last few decades, growing from a network of hardware manufacturers in the 1990s to a collection of video game developers, apps and streaming sites today.

We ranked together some of the most interesting tech startups headquartered in France, including established companies, innovative hardware manufacturers, and small startups making waves in the tech scene.

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: This Excel trick will save you time and impress your boss







Follow this link: 

The 17 hottest tech startups in France

George Lucas: If you want to watch movies on a phone ‘fine by me’

| April 18, 2015 | 0 Comments



The way we consume media has changed immensely.

If you want to watch a movie, you’re not just limited to the cinema and a TV screen anymore.

You can also stream it on your laptop, tablet, or phone.

How does George Lucas, the man behind one of the most successful movie franchises of all time, feel about that?

Pretty positively.

While discussing the next “Star Wars” film during a Tribeca Film Festival panel Friday, Stephen Colbert asked Lucas how he feels about people watching movies on small phones.

“I make movies for the big screen. That’s what I do,” said Lucas. “If you want the full experience, see it in a good theater with a good sound system, a lot of people, and it works the best. If you want to see it on a small phone, fine with me.”

“You can’t sort of tell people where to watch movies, especially in the future,” he continued. “So you just have to accept the fact people are going to look at it.”

“If you want to see it really well, and have a full experience, you’ve got to see it in a theater, but you can buy the DVD,” Lucas added. “You can do it that way. That’s fine. It’s just not the same.”

At this point, Colbert interjected to say that Lucas has “certainly put out enough versions.”

SEE ALSO: The first time George Lucas was told “Star Wars” was a big hit, he didn’t believe it

AND: George Lucas asked Colbert why he wouldn’t want to host “The Daily Show” and his response was great

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: Disney just released a new ‘Star Wars: Episode VII’ trailer and it’s incredible







More:

George Lucas: If you want to watch movies on a phone ‘fine by me’

Why Kodi Smit-Mcphee’s Nightcrawler May Differ In X-Men: Apocalypse

| April 18, 2015 | 0 Comments




As further progress on the film is made, Kodi Smit-Mcphee has opened up on his character, and whether it will be different from Alan Cumming’s portrayal of Nightcrawler in 2003’s X2: X-Men United.

Read More – 

Why Kodi Smit-Mcphee’s Nightcrawler May Differ In X-Men: Apocalypse

How Nightcrawler Will Be Different In X-Men: Apocalypse

| April 18, 2015 | 0 Comments




As further progress on the film is made, Kodi Smit-Mcphee has opened up on his character, and whether it will be different from Alan Cumming’s portrayal of Nightcrawler in 2003’s X2: X-Men United.

Jump to original – 

How Nightcrawler Will Be Different In X-Men: Apocalypse

How Google’s culture of transparency helps it prevent ‘backstabbing’

| April 18, 2015 | 0 Comments



Google as a company believes in internal transparency. 

On every software engineers’ first day, he or she gets access to almost all of Google’s code, every employee can view the personal goals and objectives (called “OKRs”) of every other employee, and the company holds all-hands meetings every Friday where anyone can ask the founders questions about anything. 

The company, as a rule, likes to “default to open.”

That manifests itself in big ways — like how the company publishes “Transparency Reports” where it shows the data requests it gets from the government — but in more subtle ways too.

For example, in the name of transparency, Googlers often discourage each other from complaining about other employees via email.

“The way we solve the ‘backstabbing’ problem, for example, is that if you write a nasty email about someone, you shouldn’t be surprised if they are added to the email thread,” Google HR boss Laszlo Bock writes in his new book, “Work Rules!” Bock continued, “I remember the first time I complained about somebody in an email and my manager promptly copied that person, which forced us to quickly resolve the issue. It was a stark lesson in the importance of having direct conversations with colleagues!”

By valuing an open and transparent company culture, Google teaches its employees that it believes them to be trustworthy and have good judgment. That, in turn, empowers them.

Having more information also gives each employee more context, which helps them do their own jobs more effectively. 

SEE ALSO: There’s a funny reason people didn’t understand how to use Google when it first launched

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: 5 Awesome Google Features You Didn’t Know About







View article:

How Google’s culture of transparency helps it prevent ‘backstabbing’

A major change is coming to Google search

| April 18, 2015 | 0 Comments



SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Google is about to change the way its influential search engine recommends websites on smartphones in a shift that’s expected to sway where millions of people shop, eat and find information.

The revised formula, scheduled to be released Tuesday, will favor websites that Google defines as “mobile-friendly.” Websites that don’t fit the description will be demoted in Google’s search results on smartphones while those meeting the criteria will be more likely to appear at the top of the rankings — a prized position that can translate into more visitors and money.

Although Google’s new formula won’t affect searches on desktop and laptop computers, it will have a huge influence on how and where people spend their money, given that more people are relying on their smartphones to compare products in stores and look for restaurants. That’s why Google’s new rating system is being billed by some search experts as “Mobile-geddon.”

“Some sites are going to be in for a big surprise when they find a drastic change in the amount of people visiting them from mobile devices,” said Itai Sadan, CEO of website-building service Duda.

It’s probably the most significant change that Google Inc. has ever made to its mobile search rankings, according to Matt McGee, editor-in-chief for Search Engine Land, a trade publication that follows every tweak that the company makes to its closely guarded algorithms.

Here are a few things to know about what’s happening and why Google is doing it.

MAKING MOBILE FRIENDS

To stay in Google’s good graces, websites must be designed so they load quickly on mobile devices. Content must also be easily accessible by scrolling up and down — without having to also swipe to the left or right. It also helps if all buttons for making purchases or taking other actions on the website can be easily seen and touched on smaller screens.

If a website has been designed only with PC users in mind, the graphics take longer to load on smartphones and the columns of text don’t all fit on the smaller screens, to the aggravation of someone trying to read it.

Google has been urging websites to cater to mobile device for years, mainly because that is where people are increasingly searching for information.

The number of mobile searches in the U.S. is rising by about 5 percent while inquiries on PCs are dipping slightly, according to research firm comScore Inc. In the final three months of last year, 29 percent of all U.S. search requests — about 18.5 billion — were made on mobile devices, comScore estimated. Google processes the bulk of searches — two-thirds in the U.S. and even more in many other countries.

BRACING FOR CHANGE

To minimize complaints, the company disclosed its plans nearly two months ago. It also created a step-by-step guide (http://bit.ly/1GyC0Id ) and a tool to test compliance with the new standards (http://bit.ly/1EVi9R3 ).

Google has faced uproar over past changes to its search formula. Two of the bigger revisions, done in 2011 and 2012, focused on an attempt to weed out misleading websites and other digital rubbish. Although that goal sounds reasonable, many websites still complained that Google’s changes unfairly demoted them in the rankings, making their content more difficult to find.

STILL CAUGHT OFF GUARD

While most major merchants and big companies already have websites likely to meet Google’s mobile standard, the new formula threatens to hurt millions of small businesses that haven’t had the money or incentive to adapt their sites for smartphones.

“A lot of small sites haven’t really had a reason to be mobile friendly until now, and it’s not going to be easy for them to make the changes,” McGee said.

BURYING HELPFUL CONTENT

Google’s search formula weighs a variety of factors to determine the rankings of its results. One of the most important considerations has always been whether a site contains the most pertinent information sought by a search request.

But new pecking order in Google’s mobile search may relegate some sites to the back pages of the search results, even if their content is more relevant to a search request than other sites that happen to be easier to access on smartphones.

That will be an unfortunate consequence, but also justifiable because a person might not even bother to look at sites that take a long time to open or difficult to read on mobile devices, Gartner analyst Whit Andrews said.

“Availability is part of relevancy,” Andrews said. “A lot of people aren’t going to think something is relevant if they can’t get it to appear on their iPhone.”

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: 8 Tips For Google Search That Will Streamline Nearly Everything You Do







Source article – 

A major change is coming to Google search

Apple just unveiled a ton of new Apple Watch Sport band colors

| April 18, 2015 | 0 Comments



Jony Ive revealed a new series of Apple Watch Sport band colors at Milan Design Week this week, 9to5Mac reports.

At an Apple showcase on Friday with Phil Schiller and Marc Newson in attendance, Ive debuted never-before-seen Sport bands in new colors, including a number of “skin tone” colors, as well as red, dark blue, and yellow.

Umberta Gnutti Beretta, a philanthropist and artist, posted a picture on Instagram showing off the new Sport band colors.

While Apple is not currently launching the Apple Watch in Italy, Milan’s influence as a harbinger of fashion makes it an important city for Apple to show off the new device. 

The Apple Watch comes in three distinct models with various bands. The cheapest option is the Apple Watch Sport with the plastic Sport Band, which was available starting last week for preorder in white, blue, green, pink, and black.

But no matter what color band you initially choose, you can swap it out. Right now it’s a small selection but what Ive has unveiled points to many more that could be on the horizon for folks in the US.

Below is Beretta’s Instagram of the new Apple Watch Sport bands:

 on

SEE ALSO: Even the cheapest Apple Watch band sounds surprisingly good

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: What it’s like to try on the Apple Watch at the Apple store







Link:  

Apple just unveiled a ton of new Apple Watch Sport band colors

The iPhone 6 Plus is my favorite computer (AAPL)

| April 18, 2015 | 0 Comments



I was getting sick of my iPhone this time last year.

I test a lot of phones, and even though I prefer Apple’s ecosystem and hardware over Android and other alternatives, I found myself drooling over the big-screen devices from Samsung, Motorola, and HTC. I always said my dream phone would be one with a large screen running Apple’s software.

That’s what I got last fall when Apple finally caught up to the rest of the industry and released two new iPhones with larger screens.

I went as big as I could and bought the iPhone 6 Plus, which has a 5.5-inch screen. Even though it’s just a bigger iPhone that runs the same apps as before, I’ve been able to center my life around one gadget instead of several.

I use my MacBook Air for writing and a few other specialized tasks, but everything else from emailing to social networking to coordinating with my colleagues in Slack takes place on my iPhone.

I’ve had the iPhone 6 Plus for a little over six months, and it’s now my primary computer. I used to have a hodgepodge of other gadgets to get stuff done, but I’ve been able to meld everything into just one device.

Here’s how I got there.

First, I ditched my iPad.

Within a few weeks, I realized my iPhone 6 Plus had replaced my iPad Mini. This wasn’t intentional. It came about organically. I don’t think I touched my iPad the first week I had the 6 Plus. Eventually, it lost its charge sitting unused on my nightstand.

I originally bought the iPad Mini in 2013 because I was sick of my tiny iPhone 5. I wanted a bigger screen to get stuff done and consume content like Netflix and articles I saved to Pocket. But I also wanted to do all that through iOS, which I think is a much better ecosystem than Android. The iPad Mini was the best choice for me. It was small enough to carry easily to meetings and interviews, but still gave me plenty of room to consume content. In fact, I found myself using my iPad more than my iPhone many days.

But the downside to that setup meant I was lugging around three gadgets: An iPhone, MacBook, and iPad. That was hardly ideal.

The iPhone 6 Plus’ 5.5-inch screen is the perfect size for everything I want to do. It’s small enough to fit in my pocket, but I still have plenty of room to watch videos or get some emailing and work done. It’s also a lot easier to type on than the tiny iPhone 5 or even the slightly larger iPhone 6. I’m a tall guy with hands to match, and typing two-handed on the iPhone in portrait mode is natural and much more comfortable for me. I can bang out lengthy emails or texts much easier now, which is a big reason why I use it more than my MacBook.

I sold my iPad Mini about a month after I got the 6 Plus. The perfect combination for me has turned out to be the iPhone 6 Plus and MacBook Air.

Battery life is great.

Next to having more space to do stuff, the other important advantage to larger phones is extended battery life. A bigger phone means a bigger battery, and the iPhone 6 Plus can usually last me a day and a half. More, if I really push it. I still charge my phone every night so I’m at 100% to start each day, but it’s been refreshing to know that I don’t have to panic about running out of juice in the evening if I want to go out after work. I haven’t had to ask a bartender or waiter to charge my phone in months.

But the large size has some drawbacks.

Even with my larger-than-average hands, it’s impossible for me to use the 6 Plus one-handed. Apple added a new feature called Reachability that lets you double-tap the home button to move that top portion of the screen down so you can tap it with your thumb, but I find that extra step annoying. I almost always end up holding my iPhone 6 Plus with two hands.

The 6 Plus is also uncomfortable in my jeans pocket, especially when I’m sitting down and it jabs into my side. I’ve developed a habit of always taking my phone out and resting it on the table when I sit somewhere. That can get distracting when I’m in a meeting and everyone in the room can see notifications whir across my lock screen.

But those are the only two cases where I consistently find the iPhone 6 Plus to be too big. Neither are deal breakers; they’re small concessions to make for all the other advantages I get.

Get the iPhone 6 Plus, not the iPhone 6.

When I first reviewed the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus, my gut told me to recommend the 6 over 6 Plus. Even though I enjoyed the Plus more, I figured it would be too large for most people.

But I’ve changed my mind.

I think the iPhone 6 Plus is the phone to buy. You get better battery life, a bigger screen, and the size won’t be too cumbersome for most people. It’s not just my phone of choice. It’s my computer of choice.

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: UNBOXED: Apple’s sleek new gold MacBook with just one port for everything







Continue reading:  

The iPhone 6 Plus is my favorite computer (AAPL)

Pee-wee Herman Is Back In This Adorable Pee-weeÂ’s Big Holiday Set Photo

| April 18, 2015 | 0 Comments




Pee-wee Herman is back in his bowtie and sending smiles across the land. Comedian Paul Reubens put his familiar costume back on and even created an Instagram account to get the world excited for his reprised role in the new Pee-wee’s Big Holiday. And boy is it doing the trick, we can’t wait!

View article:  

Pee-wee Herman Is Back In This Adorable Pee-weeÂ’s Big Holiday Set Photo

Scientists have discovered how to keep captive stingrays from getting bored

| April 18, 2015 | 0 Comments




Captive stingrays are now being tested with brain teasers to improve their quality of life. 

Researchers from James Cook University in Queensland, Australia have developed a test that stimulates memory by putting food on targets. They hope it will reduce the animals’ boredom and help to mimic life in the wild.

This type of target practice has been used before to help sharks, but it’s the first time it’s been tested on stingrays.

Produced by Jason Gaines. Video courtesy of Associated Press.

Follow BI Video: On Facebook

 

Join the conversation about this story »







Original link:

Scientists have discovered how to keep captive stingrays from getting bored

How Steve Jobs became the greatest businessman the world has ever known (AAPL)

| April 18, 2015 | 0 Comments



A vegan college dropout who took acid and traveled to India for spiritual enlightenment, Steve Jobs was the greatest businessman in history.

But Jobs’ ascent was neither simple nor straightforward.

Jobs’ life story is well known to many, but as a quick reminder: Jobs was kicked out of Apple, a company he founded, in the 1980s, returned to it in the late ’90s, and eventually turned Apple into the world’s most valuable company before he died of cancer in 2011.

In addition to his success at Apple, he was the CEO of Pixar, one of the most successful animation studios ever.

Jobs bought Pixar from George Lucas for $5 million in 1985 and sold it to Disney for $7.4 billion in 2006. For anyone else, Pixar would be in the lead paragraph of a story about one’s talents as a businessman. For Jobs, it’s the fourth paragraph.

As with any great success in the world, people want to know how Jobs did it. How did Steve Jobs become so successful?

Jobs’ story is intriguing, because early in his career it seemed as if he couldn’t get out of his own way. Sure, he launched the Apple I computer, the Apple II computer, and the Macintosh, but he was a rough boss.

He was exacting on employees, and sometimes insulting. It was a mistake that he was pushed out of Apple. But it wasn’t necessarily a surprise. He was a difficult person to deal with.

How did Jobs go from brilliant but flawed visionary to the greatest businessman in history? Brent Schlender and Rick Tetzeli tackle this question in a 412-page look at Jobs’ career, “Becoming Steve Jobs: The Evolution of a Reckless Upstart into a Visionary Leader.”

Their book relies heavily on Schlender’s relationship with Jobs, which started in April 1986 when he visited Jobs at his then new company, NeXT, for The Wall Street Journal. Over the decades to come, the two developed a friendship of sorts, though Schlender says it was always a professional relationship in which he saw Jobs as a source. (Jobs used to dish Schlender gossip about what was happening at Apple after Jobs was booted from the company.)

“Becoming Steve Jobs” got full participation, and tacit endorsement, from Apple. The authors had access to Jobs’ closest coworkers during the end of his time at Apple. CEO Tim Cook, SVP Eddy Cue, SVP Jony Ive, and former head of PR Katie Cotton spoke on the record for the book. There are interviews with other former Apple executives. They also spoke to Jobs’ widow, Laurene Powell Jobs.

Apple’s participation seems to be a concerted effort to take control of Jobs’ legacy.

Before he died, Jobs gave unprecedented access to Walter Isaacson for an authorized biography. While that book has become the definitive tome on Jobs thanks to the access, Jobs’ closest friends and family have a dim view of it.

Ive, Apple’s head of design and Jobs’ closest professional partner, recently said of the book, “My regard couldn’t be any lower.” He felt the book was riddled with inaccuracies.

Cook told the authors of “Becoming Steve Jobs”:

I thought the Isaacson book did him a tremendous disservice. It was just a rehash of a bunch of stuff that had already been written, and focused on small parts of his personality. You get the feeling that [Steve’s] a greedy, selfish egomaniac. It didn’t capture the person. The person I read about there is somebody I would never have wanted to work with over all this time.

It’s been years since I read Isaacson’s book, but I remember thinking the book felt flawed. After reading it I was left with two questions: Why did anyone want to work with Jobs? He seemed like an unbearable tyrant. And how did Jobs flip from being a petulant jerk in the 1980s to a brilliant CEO in the 2000s?

Therefore I was excited to read “Becoming Steve Jobs.” Alas, the book doesn’t live up to the lofty expectations created by getting Apple’s endorsement. That doesn’t mean it’s not a good book. If you have interest in Apple and Jobs, it’s well worth the read. But it doesn’t have a strong narrative, which makes it a somewhat slow read for a broader audience. It’s like a 412-page magazine article on Jobs packed with great anecdotes and nuggets of news.

Having read the book, I have some theories on how Jobs transformed himself (I’ll get to them in a bit). But Bill Gates has the best advice for anyone trying to figure out how to emulate Jobs’ success.

“Maybe you should call your book Don’t Try This at Home,” Gates told the authors. “So many of the people who want to be like Steve have the asshole side down. What they’re missing is the genius part.”

This is the simple truth. Jobs’ success was singular. Any attempt to re-create it will fall flat. If it were as easy as studying what he did and replicating it, we’d all be famous billionaires.

But that doesn’t mean we can’t learn more about Jobs from this book. After reading the book, here are three things that I think made him a monster success.

1. Jobs was supernaturally articulate.

This is a theme of the book.

Pixar president Ed Catmull said that whenever there was a problem with a film, he’d call Jobs and say, “Steve, I think we’ve got a problem.” He wouldn’t say anything else. Jobs would drive up to Pixar’s offices. He would watch a film in a screening room with everyone. Then he offered his own take on what was wrong with the film.

“Steve never said anything that hadn’t already been said by one of the other brain trust members. But there is something about his presence, and he was so articulate, that he could take the same thing said by somebody else and just cut right through it. Steve would preface it by saying, ‘I’m not a filmmaker, you can ignore everything I say.’ He literally said that every time. He would then just say what he thought the problem was. Right? Only, the fact that it was articulate was the gut punch. He didn’t tell them to do anything, he just told them what he thought.”

Ive, Jobs’ closest partner at Apple, said something similar:

“He could refine and describe ideas so much better than anyone else could. I think very quickly he understood that I had a specific proficiency in terms of having good taste and understanding aesthetics and form. But one of my problems is that I’m not always as articulate as I would like to be. I can feel things intuitively, and Steve could sense the full meaning of what I was getting at. So I didn’t have to justify it explicitly. And then what would happen was I would then see him articulate those ideas but in a way that I was completely incapable of doing. And that’s what was so amazing. I learned, I got better at it, but obviously was never ever in his league.”

Previously, Jobs’ powers of persuasion were derided as a “reality-distortion field.” But, really, this was one of Jobs’ greatest strengths as a leader. The ability to clearly lay out what he wanted made Apple and Pixar stronger companies. A clear mind leads to great products. If CEOs can’t express themselves, how are employees going to know what to do?

Jobs ability to articulate ideas wasn’t exactly a state secret. He was smart in just about every interview he did. Here’s a good example:

2. Jobs hired the right people and trusted them to do their jobs.

One theory from the book on why Jobs struggled in his first run at Apple is that he had the wrong people around him.

Today, technology companies have figured out how to let a founder run his company with proper guidance. Larry Page and Sergey Brin hired Eric Schmidt to be “adult supervision” as they built Google. Mark Zuckerberg had Sheryl Sandberg to help him build Facebook’s business.

In 1976, Jobs didn’t have the right adult supervision.

The authors say that Apple’s first CEO, Michael Scott, was “not a great CEO.” “He had the skills and personality of a COO — a chief operating officer,” they write. He was “frazzled” by the lack of stability at Apple as it tackled the personal-computing market.

Apple’s next CEO, John Sculley, turned out to be “the wrong guy” for the job, according to Jobs. Sculley forced Jobs out of the company, which Sculley later admitted was a mistake.

By the time Jobs came back to Apple, in 1997, he was the boss. And he installed a team of executives he trusted. He let those people do their jobs, interfering only when it made sense to do so.

Ron Johnson, who led retail for Apple, said when he first started at Apple, in 2000, Jobs mostly talked to him about personal matters. Johnson says Jobs told him early on, “I want to be good friends, because once you know how I think we only have to talk once or twice a week. Then when you want to do something you can do it and not feel that you have to ask permission.”

This cuts counter to the idea that Jobs was a domineering micromanager. Jobs jumped in on certain projects, but he felt comfortable enough with his executive team to let them do their jobs.

3. Jobs stopped chasing the revolutionary and started accepting the evolutionary.

As I said earlier, there’s no single answer to the question of how Steve Jobs became Steve Jobs. But this might be the closest we get.

When Jobs was at Apple in the ’80s, he was obsessed with creating world-changing products. This was good for the world but came at a cost for Apple.

The best example of this was the original Macintosh. Jobs was pulled from working on the Lisa computer in 1980. He was shifted to working on the Macintosh, which was supposed to be a $1,000 personal computer. Jobs quickly decided that he didn’t want to make a $1,000 computer. He ousted the person who had been leading the project. He spent $1 million, installed the Mac team in its own building, and hoisted a pirate flag in front of it. Four years later, he released a $1,995 computer.

While the Mac is celebrated as a landmark achievement, the authors of “Becoming Steve Jobs” say it was flawed. They say the computer was underpowered. Sales tanked in the second half of 1984, and the Apple II still accounted for 70% of Apple’s sales. At the same time IBM’s PC sales took off, and that led to Windows dominating the PC market.

When Jobs returned to Apple, his first move was to simplify the product line focusing on four products: a consumer laptop, a professional laptop, a consumer desktop, and a professional desktop computer. He didn’t come back and say “We need to reinvent the wheel.” He just wanted to refine the products that existed.

After those products were stable, in 2001, Apple released the iPod, which took time to become a blockbuster.

The book makes it sound as if in the early years Jobs was impatient. He wanted product hit after hit. Later in his career, he was happy to refine his hit products, which is what he did with the iPod and the iPhone.

4. Bonus: the real reason.

While all of these explanations provide some insight into how Jobs became Jobs, really the world caught up to him.

Look at the authors’ description of the original Macintosh:

Truth is, the Mac that Steve had delivered was deeply flawed. It was a brilliant piece of engineering and a gorgeous vision of where computing could go, but it was far too underpowered to be useful. Trying to hold the Mac to a $1,995 retail price, he had refused to include more than 128K of memory — about a tenth of what came with the higher-priced Lisa. The Mac’s bitmapping technology soaked up the power. The lines and characters that appeared on its screen were pretty, but they sometimes took forever to show up. In fact, the original Mac did just about everything at a glacial pace. It came with a floppy disk drive rather than a hard drive, so copying files from one floppy disk to another was an arduous process in which the user had to pop the two floppies in and out of the computer multiple times. Adding to the machine’s woes: the Mac launched with hardly any software, because the operating system was still being tweaked right up to the day of the launch. No wonder sales dried up. In his effort to realize a vision, Steve had slighted the machine’s utility.

That sounds pretty damning. And yet it could apply to just about every single Apple product launched by Jobs in his second run at Apple.

The first iPod held only 1,000 songs. It cost $399, versus $100 for a CD player at the time. But very quickly its storage expanded. The product got cheaper. Everything about it improved.

The first iPhone was missing a lot of key features. The original MacBook Air was an expensive, underpowered computer. Even today, the Apple Watch is limited. As is the new MacBook.

That’s how it works in technology. The first product won’t be perfect. It’s a glimpse of the future. Apple refines its idea over years, and eventually the technology catches up and it becomes the defining product in its category.

In 1985, Apple’s board, and the world, didn’t see that. By 1997, when Jobs returned, the world was finally ready for him. And Jobs was ready for the world. He was older and wiser. He had a family, which made him more mellow. Add it all up, and we start to get a sense of how Jobs became Jobs. It’s not the most satisfying answer, but it’s closest to the truth.

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: Kids settle the debate and tell us which is better: an Apple or Samsung phone







Original link: 

How Steve Jobs became the greatest businessman the world has ever known (AAPL)

37 incredible drone photos from across the globe that would be totally illegal today

| April 18, 2015 | 0 Comments




Click to see the amazing aerial photos »

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: How to supercharge your iPhone in only 5 minutes







Read original article:  

37 incredible drone photos from across the globe that would be totally illegal today

24 of the toughest interview questions heard at Facebook

| April 18, 2015 | 0 Comments



Facebook has often been regarded as one of the best places to work in the tech industry.

Its interns make $25,000 more than the average citizen. And famously, employees on Glassdoor voted Facebook the No. 1 company to work for overall.

But in order to get a job there, you’ll have to answer some tricky questions first.

We’ve compiled some of the toughest Facebook interview questions available on Glassdoor. Whether you’re looking for a programming job or a position doing marketing, Facebook’s interview questions will give you a run for your money.

“There is a building with 100 floors. You are given 2 identical eggs. How do you use 2 eggs to find the threshold floor, where the egg will definitely break from any floor above floor N, including floor N itself.” – Data Scientist candidate

“If you were going to redesign an ATM machine, how would you do it?” – Product Designer candidate

“How many birthday posts occur on Facebook on a given day?” – Data Scientist candidate

See the rest of the story at Business Insider






This article is from: 

24 of the toughest interview questions heard at Facebook

1 Million men go part-time, a 14% increase in two years

| April 18, 2015 | 0 Comments




Figures show there has been a 14 per cent rise in the number of men opting to work part-time in the last two years. That contrasts with a 4 per cent rise in women choosing part-time work over the same period.

See the original article here – 

1 Million men go part-time, a 14% increase in two years

How the iPhone 6 compares to its biggest rival, the Samsung Galaxy S6 (AAPL)

| April 18, 2015 | 0 Comments



The long-standing competition between Apple and Samsung has never been as close as it is today.

Earlier this month, Samsung officially launched the Galaxy S6 — which is arguably its best phone to date. Some may even call it the best Android phone on the market right now.

Samsung has improved its latest Galaxy phone in all the right ways — from the way it looks and feels to the software and how well the camera works. But is it enough to convince iPhone users to switch?

We’ve compared the Galaxy S6 and iPhone 6 side-by-side to see exactly how they compare in terms of display quality, performance, battery life, and more. 

Design

For a long time, the iPhone was the best-looking phone out there by a long shot. It was the only one with a metal, unibody design that looked and felt elite, sleek, and beautiful. That’s not necessarily true anymore — HTC’s One set a new standard for other Android phones in terms of design when the One M7 launched in 2013.

Now, two years later, Samsung has released its most gorgeous phone yet.

The Galaxy S6 still has the same shape as its predecessors, but it feels much more premium. The back is made of a smooth glass, while Samsung uses brushed aluminum for the edges. It’s really light too — Samsung sacrificed a few things to make improvements to the phone’s design (i.e. there’s no removeable back so you can’t change the battery), but since it’s not completely made of metal, it’s not any heavier than previous Samsung phones.

The iPhone looks and feels just as premium, but most of the phone is made of brushed aluminum. It’s ever so slightly thinner than the Galaxy S6, but you really only notice when stacking the two on top of one another. The iPhone 6 is 6.8mm thin, while the Galaxy S6 is 7mm thin. 

There are positives and negatives to both phones in terms of design — the iPhone can be slippery if you’re using it without a case, while the Galaxy S6 gets smudged up with fingerprints really easily if you’re using it without a cover. 

Overall, I prefer the Galaxy S6’s design, mostly because it feels more durable and less like I’m going to drop it. I also really like the way the metal frame looks against the glass body. There’s no doubt that it bears some resemblance to the iPhone, but if anything, it took the best design aspects of the iPhone and combined them, in my opinion. The metal edges look like those of the iPhone 6, but the glass front and back are a lot like the iPhone 4/4s. 

Winner: Galaxy S6

Display

Both phones come with gorgeous screens, but here’s where they differ: The Galaxy S6 exaggerates colors a lot, but the iPhone’s screen is brighter. I really noticed this while watching a trailer for the new “Daredevil” series on Netflix. Even in dark scenes, the areas of the screen that are colorful appeared much brighter on the S6.

This photo of the Marvel logo on both phones really illustrates the difference:

Some may argue that the iPhone’s colors are more accurate, but I generally preferred viewing photos and videos on the Galaxy S6. I should preface this, however, by saying that both phones have really good screens. If you were to watch a video on either one, you would be satisfied with the quality. It just so happens that colors pop a lot more on the S6.

And, even though the Galaxy S6’s screen should be sharper and more detailed than that of the iPhone based on specs alone (the iPhone 6 has a 1334 x 750 screen while the Galaxy S6 has a 2560 x 1440 resolution screen), I didn’t notice a difference in that area. 

Since the iPhone’s screen is brighter, however, you might have an easier time seeing it in bright sunlight. 

Winner: Galaxy S6

Battery life

The battery life is nearly the same on both the iPhone 6 and Galaxy S6, but the iPhone’s is slightly better. My colleague Steve Kovach wrote that both phones lasted for about full workday after normal to heavy usage, and I’ve experienced the same.

Tech site AnandTech performed a formal battery test, which consisted of consistently browsing the web on each phone. The iPhone 6 lasted almost 11.5 hours, while the Galaxy S6 lasted for a little over 10 hours. The iPhone 6 Plus trumped every phone on the list with a battery life of over 13 hours, according to AnandTech’s testing.  

It’s also worth noting that the Galaxy S6 comes with quick charging, as long as you’re using the charger that comes with the phone. Plus, it supports wireless charging and is compatible with any wireless charging pad you can find at Best Buy. 

Winner: iPhone 6

Camera

The past several generations of iPhones have all had top-notch cameras, and the iPhone 6 is no different. But Samsung has made several improvements to its camera, too, including the ability to shoot better photos in low light. The Galaxy S6’s camera, like its screen, does tend to favor color. You can tell that the yellow shade of the banana below is a bit bolder in the S6’s photo.

iPhone 6

Galaxy S6

I generally preferred the iPhone 6’s indoor photo, though. In the photos below, which were taken in a somewhat-dim living room, the iPhone preserved more detail.

iPhone 6

Galaxy S6

It’s a tough call, but this round goes to the iPhone, simply because I believe the color is just more accurate than that of the Galaxy S6. To be clear, though, the S6’s camera is pretty excellent, and is definitely better than that of the HTC One M9, as you can see in my in-depth camera comparison here.

Winner: iPhone 6

Interface and apps

It’s hard to argue whether or not iOS is better than Android — ultimately, it comes down to a personal preference. Android is much more customizable than iOS: you can add widgets to certain apps and tools to your home screen, add different themes, and install launchers that give you access to different apps and features straight from the home screen. You can’t do anything like that on the iPhone, although Apple did add a widget-like feature for the notification center when iOS 8 came out last year.

Samsung’s latest flavor of Android, which it calls TouchWiz, is its best yet. It’s less busy and cluttered than the software you’ll find on the Galaxy S5 and Galaxy S4. It looks more like the basic version of Android that ships on Google’s Nexus phones, but you still get the few Samsung features that are useful. For example, you can open more than one app in separate windows on the home screen, and you can swap out various quick settings options when dragging down from the top of the screen. It’s slick, clean, and fast.

Apple’s iOS is much more closed and restricted. You can’t change the theme, add widgets, or anything similar in that regard. But the simplicity is part of what makes iOS so appealing — anyone can pick it up and figure out how to use it. Your apps are right there on the home screen, and that’s really all there is to it. 

Even though it’s really about preference, there are two areas where iOS has an advantage: since it’s all controlled by Apple, every iPhone and iPad gets updated to the next version of iOS at the same time. With Android devices, including those made by Samsung, it could take months to get the latest Android software update. Popular apps also tend to come out on the iPhone before they’re released for Android. Take Instagram and Vine for example. Mostly for those reasons, I’m giving the apps and interface section to the iPhone.

Winner: iPhone 6

Special features

Both the Galaxy S6 and iPhone 6 come with a fingerprint sensor for unlocking your phone and approving purchases, but Samsung’s phone simply has more extras. The Galaxy S6 comes with Samsung Pay, which works at any payments terminal as opposed to the iPhone 6’s Apple Pay, which only works where NFC is supported (Samsung’s phone also has NFC, too). 

The Galaxy S6 also has a heart rate monitor and supports wireless charging, which my colleague Steve Kovach found to be extremely convenient in his review. Samsung wins this round.

Winner: Galaxy S6

Overall thoughts

If you were to calculate each round, you would see that both phones are tied. But it’s not the number of rounds you win; it’s which rounds you win. My personal preference is the iPhone, because it succeeds in all of the areas that are really important to me: battery life, apps, and camera. That’s not to say the Galaxy S6 performs poorly in either of those areas — it’s an excellent phone with a great screen, and it’s just as good-looking, if not better looking, than the iPhone. But because I know that apps tend to launch on the iPhone first, and I prefer the cleaner look of iOS compared to Android, I’m sticking with the iPhone. The Galaxy S6, though, is probably the best Android phone you can buy at this point. 

SEE ALSO: 11 awesome cases for your new Samsung Galaxy S6

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: How to supercharge your iPhone in only 5 minutes







View original article: 

How the iPhone 6 compares to its biggest rival, the Samsung Galaxy S6 (AAPL)

DAILY MAIL COMMENT: How Tories can stop Red Ed and the SNP 

| April 18, 2015 | 0 Comments





From: 

DAILY MAIL COMMENT: How Tories can stop Red Ed and the SNP 

Why every gardener needs a… flame thrower: From robotic lawnmowers to weed-destroying…

| April 18, 2015 | 0 Comments





Taken from: 

Why every gardener needs a… flame thrower: From robotic lawnmowers to weed-destroying…

Prince William and Kate Middleton’s love map of Britain

| April 18, 2015 | 0 Comments





Read More – 

Prince William and Kate Middleton’s love map of Britain

SEBASTIAN SHAKESPEARE: Lady Falkender claims £128,000 for five years of taxis to Lords

| April 18, 2015 | 0 Comments





Source article:

SEBASTIAN SHAKESPEARE: Lady Falkender claims £128,000 for five years of taxis to Lords

PLATELL’S PEOPLE: Why we women can’t stand Sturgeon

| April 18, 2015 | 0 Comments





Jump to original: 

PLATELL’S PEOPLE: Why we women can’t stand Sturgeon

Love your hair ladies before you lose it writes SARAH VINE 

| April 18, 2015 | 0 Comments





Continue reading here: 

Love your hair ladies before you lose it writes SARAH VINE 

I wasn’t shown fresh evidence of Lord Janner’s alleged abuse of children, says former DPP

| April 18, 2015 | 0 Comments





Originally posted here – 

I wasn’t shown fresh evidence of Lord Janner’s alleged abuse of children, says former DPP

The nightmare of booking a holiday villa – then finding it doesn’t exist: Police say cons cost…

| April 18, 2015 | 0 Comments





Link:

The nightmare of booking a holiday villa – then finding it doesn’t exist: Police say cons cost…

Elsie Frost’s murder unsolved after 95 years with links to Yorkshire Ripper

| April 18, 2015 | 0 Comments





Read article here: 

Elsie Frost’s murder unsolved after 95 years with links to Yorkshire Ripper

Kensington neighbour with a past as colourful as her £15m house

| April 18, 2015 | 0 Comments





View original article: 

Kensington neighbour with a past as colourful as her £15m house

Eco tycoon Dale Vince’s ex-wife wants his millions 23 years AFTER divorce

| April 18, 2015 | 0 Comments





Continue reading:

Eco tycoon Dale Vince’s ex-wife wants his millions 23 years AFTER divorce

ROBERT HARDMAN chilled by Scotland’s determination to elect neurotic far-Left dinosaurs

| April 18, 2015 | 0 Comments





See original article here:

ROBERT HARDMAN chilled by Scotland’s determination to elect neurotic far-Left dinosaurs

We won’t go to war with Britain over Falklands oil, says Argentina after backing lawsuit against…

| April 18, 2015 | 0 Comments





View original – 

We won’t go to war with Britain over Falklands oil, says Argentina after backing lawsuit against…