Recent Articles

San Francisco’s marijuana gym really could help some people get fit

| May 26, 2016 | 0 Comments



This fall, San Francisco’s fitness-inclined cannabis enthusiasts will be able to indulge in herbal supplements to their fitness routine, thanks to the planned opening of weed-friendly gym Power Plant Fitness — provided they have their California medical marijuana card (which we hear is not so hard to get).

Gym co-founder Jim McAlpine told Tech Insider that the gym plans to use cannabis as a tool both for focus and recovery, and that they’ll be helping gym members figure out how to best incorporate marijuana into their routine.

Mixing marijuana with athletic pursuits might sound unlikely, but a number of athletes have said training while high has helped them unlock new performance gains.

Marijuana might actually help some people perform better at certain sports.

The upcoming Power Plant Fitness has been described as perhaps the first “marijuana gym,” but that doesn’t mean it’s the only place that teaches the gospel of an herbally enhanced workout. In November of 2014, Men’s Journal interviewed elite triathlete Clifford Drusinsky, a Colorado gym owner who also leads training sessions fueled by marijuana edibles. 

“Marijuana relaxes me and allows me to go into a controlled, meditational place,” Drusinsky told Men’s Journal. “When I get high, I train smarter and focus on form.”

Outside Magazine correspondent Gordy Megroz wrote in the February 2015 issue of that magazine that while he has never been much of a pot smoker, he heard enough close friends — especially skiers — say that getting high helped their performance that he decided to give it a shot.

Megroz first tried a cannabis gummy while on a snow-covered mountain and wrote that with a “slight yet very functional high,” he “felt invincible and proceeded to attack the steepest lines without fear” — ski-speak for feeling able to tackle the craziest parts of a mountain. It’s easy to see how this kind of fearlessness could be appealing to an expert skier, but could lead anyone — especially a novice — into making a dangerous decision.

Stanford Medical School professor Keith Humphreys explained to Megroz that there’s a scientific explanation for this. “We have cannabinoid receptors throughout our brains, and when the THC hits those receptors, it triggers a system that reduces anxiety,” Humphreys said. “That you would feel more aggressive is a natural reaction to the drug.”

In the World Anti-Doping Association’s current ban on competing while stoned, the organization cites studies that show marijuana can decrease anxiety and increase airflow to the lungs by acting as a bronchodilator, something that decreases resistance in the airways.

So Megroz decided to perform further tests, with the help (and under the supervision) of a physiologist.

The basic test was simple. He got on a treadmill, set the pace for five miles per hour, and then increased the ramp angle 2.5% every two minutes.

Sober, he could keep it up for 19 minutes. But stoned, he could last 19:30 — a “substantial performance gain,” according to the physiologist. He repeated the test twice more with similar results.

He also found that he got less sore after a heavy squat session.

In other words, getting stoned helped him perform and recover better.

Of course, this was a small, uncontrolled test, on just one person. And while testing mountain-biking performance, the results weren’t quite as good. Megroz writes that while he started off feeling “flowy and fast, [riding] much better than when” sober, he soon misjudged his speed and rode off the trail.

So what does the science say about marijuana and exercise?

Here, we have a big problem. There isn’t much research available yet on how pot affects performance. As long as marijuana is considered a Schedule 1 drug by the Drug Enforcement Agency, it’s incredibly difficult for researchers to study its effects. It’s becoming easier as states legalize medical and recreational use, but there isn’t a ton of research yet, and it’ll still be hard to do unless the government changes that policy.

And some research (along with the aforementioned anecdotal “evidence”) would seem to show that pot doesn’t help anyone do anything athletic.

Megroz cites a 1975 paper that found a 25% decrease in power output among study subjects after smoking marijuana — but there were only eight people in that study and they all had asthma, which means this tells almost nothing about the general population, especially since smoking could have triggered already-existing problems in asthma patients. Another 1977 paper he cites found some decreased motor control among a group of six experienced pot smokers when they got high, though they didn’t show significant changes in reaction time.

But the little evidence we have on pot also explains some potential performance gains. Researchers say that marijuana has an anti-inflammatory effect and that the chemical compounds that come from weed might mimic the body’s natural endorphins, which could help increase our pain threshold like a natural runner’s high and make it easier to push through a tough workout.

So there’s evidence that pot can help people deal with pain and inflammation while decreasing anxiety and improving mood, but it also has potentially risky motor-control side effects that could lead to an accident, especially in a sport where a wrong turn (like mountain biking or skiing) could be disastrous.

Anecdotally, both Outside and Men’s Journal found endurance athletes, professional fighters, and mountain athletes like skiers and rock climbers who say that pot can help them train — and there’s a big argument that NFL players might be better off using pot instead of prescription painkillers to deal with their day-to-day injuries.

When we’ve written about this in the past, a number of athletes — especially those focused on endurance — have contacted Tech Insider to say they’re big fans of training with marijuana.

Yet decreased anxiety from marijuana use could lead to dangerous decisions. There is also a temporary elevated heart rate associated with consuming marijuana, which could be a negative side effect for athletes and a risky complication for anyone with a preexisting heart condition.

There just isn’t much research out there yet.

We should clarify that we don’t advocate exercising while high, as that’s illegal in most states and whatever effect it does have on performance, there is certainly the possibility that decreased motor control could lead to a serious accident.

But is this something that should be researched and discussed more as the wave of decriminalization and legalization continues to sweep across the country? Absolutely. We’re curious to hear how things at Power Plant Fitness work out.

This is an updated version of a previously published story.

SEE ALSO: There’s a new exchange for weed, and Wall Street veterans are flocking to it

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: 7 surprising medical benefits of marijuana



View article: 

San Francisco’s marijuana gym really could help some people get fit

Google just won its epic legal battle with Oracle — here’s why that matters (GOOG, ORCL)

| May 26, 2016 | 0 Comments



On Thursday, a jury found that Google didn’t violate Oracle’s copyright with its Android operating system — ending the $9 billion lawsuit that had the whole tech industry on edge.

Oracle had alleged that Google violated its copyright when it put pieces of the crucial Java technology into Android, which now ships on 80% of smartphones sold. Google’s defense hinged on “fair use,” the idea that it was legally allowed to use Java as it did.

At the core of the conflict was a fundamental culture clash over “open source,” or code that’s made freely available, under a far more permissive copyright, for any use people can find for it.

Open source is a pillar of the software industry, with a huge and thriving community of developers and companies who rely on it to various extents. Even Microsoft, which spent a long time opposing open source, has come around to embrace it.

The jury found in Google’s favor. But if Oracle v. Google had gone the other way, it could have had huge ramifications for the way software is built and marketed. It would have meant a big payday for Oracle, and a total shift in the industry.

What is open source?

The core concept of open source, as former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer once infamously noted, is akin to communism. Developers, including teams of employees at companies like Google, Netflix, and Apple, share code that they’ve been working on with the world. In return, they reap the benefits when the community improves it.

If you hang out with open-source people long enough, you’ll end up hearing some variation on “all of us are smarter than any one of us.” Because successful open source projects have dozens, hundreds, or thousands of programmers improving the same code from different angles, the software can get way better, way faster than any proprietary tool.

That’s why open source is increasingly in vogue with tech companies who find themselves in a race to improve their products as fast as consumers get bored with them. Apple uses the open source Mesos software, a tool first pioneered at Twitter and Airbnb, to manage the huge number of requests Siri gets every day.

It’s also extremely common for companies, especially startups, to take open-source software and use it as the basis for a real commercial product that they’ll actually sell. Open source presents the opportunity to avoid reinventing the wheel, and instead focus on building a viable product.

For instance, a scientific paper that Google wrote in 2003 became the genesis of Yahoo’s Hadoop data-analysis software in 2006. When Yahoo released Hadoop as open source, it became the foundational technology at a string of hot startups that include Hortonworks, Cloudera, and Platfora.

Which brings us back to Oracle v. Google.

Where Google got into trouble

The testimony in this lawsuit tells the whole story.

When Google was first building Android around 2005 and 2006, it knew that Apple was building something good with what would become the iPhone.

To get their operating system out the door faster, Google decided that instead of building certain crucial pieces itself from scratch, it would use Java — a well-established technology that lots of would-be Android app developers were already familiar with.

Alphabet chairman and former Google CEO Eric Schmidt testified in this case that he went to Sun Microsystems (now owned by Oracle), the original developer of Java, to try to properly license Java for $30 million to $40 million. Those talks fell apart, apparently because Sun was worried about giving up control of the mobile space.

Google cofounder Larry Page testified that Google did use a whole bunch of Java code in Android, skipping the bits that they thought Sun alone had the rights to and rewriting what they couldn’t take in-house.

But Page says that Google only did this because Java was available as open source. Android cofounder Andy Rubin further testified that Google didn’t believe that the parts of Java that they used were copyrighted (though he’s in hot water over an email he sent that suggests otherwise).

Originally, Google was claiming that Oracle could not copyright APIs, or application programming interfaces, which are the “hooks” that lets software and websites talk to each other. An API is how, say, “Candy Crush Saga” logs you in with a Facebook account.

But a court decision ruled that the pieces of the code that Google used were in fact Oracle’s intellectual property under the law. So Google invoked a “fair use” defense — admitting that Oracle owns the copyright to those pieces of Java, but claiming that Google should be allowed to use the code commercially.

Between the lines

If Google’s fair-use defense didn’t work, it could have set an alarming precedent for the tech industry.

Open source is the way of the world for many, many technology companies. And the kinds of API code that Oracle has taken issue with here are of a kind that makes their way into many, many pieces of software. It’s not quite ubiquitous, but it’s close.

A ruling against Google here would have meant that established tech companies like Oracle could have a new source of revenue: Finding startups and developers that use Java or other technology that could be found to be copyrightable, and claiming damages.

If Google couldn’t have mounted a successful defense, it’s unlikely anyone else would have better luck.

It wouldn’t have been great news for software innovation, by any stretch. A big part of open source is free and open communication and collaboration. If developers are worried that they might get sued, the next great open-source software project may simply never get built.

And while it seems likely that Oracle will appeal this case, Google has successfully fended off that worst-case scenario for now.

SEE ALSO: Oracle says that it had to give Amazon a 97.5 percent discount just to stay competitive with Google

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: Google Earth’s time-lapse tool shows you 28 years of change in a few seconds



Link to article:

Google just won its epic legal battle with Oracle — here’s why that matters (GOOG, ORCL)

Jury finds Google’s implementation of Java in Android was fair use

| May 26, 2016 | 0 Comments




 Software developers can breathe a massive sigh of relief — a jury found today that Google’s implementation of 37 Java APIs in Android qualified as fair use. However, Oracle attorneys have already indicated that they will appeal the decision.
“Today’s verdict that Android makes fair use of Java APIs represents a win for the Android ecosystem, for the Java programming… Read More


See original article: 

Jury finds Google’s implementation of Java in Android was fair use

SpaceX is about to attempt another extremely difficult landing — here’s how to watch live

| May 26, 2016 | 0 Comments



SpaceX is planning to launch its fifth rocket of the year this Thursday at 5:40 p.m. ET.

The Falcon 9 rocket will be launching out of Cape Canaveral, Florida, carrying a communications satellite called that weighs nearly 7,000 lbs. As of Tuesday afternoon, weather conditions look good for the launch.

Once up, the satellite, which was built by aerospace manufacturer Orbital ATK for Thailand’s first satellite operator Thaicom PLC, will provide TV and internet services to Southeast Asia.

SpaceX’s track record for launches has been nearly flawless this year, with four successful launches and three successful landings (and retrievals!) of the first stage of the rockets. One of those successes took place on land in December; two more happened in April and May at sea.

SpaceX will once again attempt to land the first stage of the rocket on a drone ship in the Atlantic. If it succeeds, it’ll be:

The fourth successful retrieval of the first stage of a Falcon 9 rocket 
The third successful at-sea landing 
The second successful landing after launching to the extremely high geostationary orbit, more than 22,000 miles above Earth’s equator

During SpaceX’s last launch, Elon Musk admitted he wasn’t sure if they’d stick the landing, citing the extreme heat and velocity the rocket faced upon reentry into Earth’s atmosphere.

But it did. And although it was a hugely surprising success, the re-landed first stage suffered “maximum damage,” meaning it’s not going back to space again anytime soon. Instead, SpaceX plans to use the rocket for ground tests.

Perfecting the landing of the first stage of its Falcon 9 rockets brings SpaceX closer to its ultimate goal: Making these rockets reusable, and thereby dramatically cutting the cost of spaceflight. This launch will give it yet another opportunity to prove that it can achieve this.

A report in Florida Today states that the weather conditions for the flight are looking to be near-perfect, with US Air Force meteorologists predicting a 90% chance of favorable conditions for launch.

Check out the SpaceX’s webcast of the launch below:

SEE ALSO: Here’s what Elon Musk plans to do with the 3rd SpaceX rocket he managed to land

DON’T MISS: Even Elon Musk wasn’t sure if SpaceX could nail this incredibly difficult landing

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: A SpaceX rocket just did something not even its engineers thought was possible



Original post – 

SpaceX is about to attempt another extremely difficult landing — here’s how to watch live

‘Revengeance’ Trailer: Bill Plympton’s Eighth Feature Might Be His Quirkiest Yet —…

| May 26, 2016 | 0 Comments



Cartoon Brew reveals an exclusive trailer for “Revengeance,” the new animated feature by Bill Plympton and Jim Lujan.

The post ‘Revengeance’ Trailer: Bill Plympton’s Eighth Feature Might Be His Quirkiest Yet — Exclusive appeared first on Cartoon Brew.


Follow this link – 

‘Revengeance’ Trailer: Bill Plympton’s Eighth Feature Might Be His Quirkiest Yet —…

Google won its lawsuit against Oracle

| May 26, 2016 | 0 Comments



Google has won in its trial against Oracle. The verdict was just handed down.

The jury decided that Google’s use of the disputed code was “fair use.”

Oracle was attempting to sue Google for billions of dollars. It had won a previous lawsuit, on appeal.

Oracle was suing Google because Google included portions of computer code called “application programming interfaces” or “APIs” in Android that had come from another programming language called Java.

Oracle owns Java, acquired when it bought Sun Microsystems.

APIs allow computer programs to talk to each other and share information. Google was found to have used 37 APIs from Java, or about 11,000 lines of code, out of Android’s about 5 million lines of code.

Google did not take the whole APIs, but it used the same names and operations, then wrote its own code to implement the functionality. 

Google’s main point in defense: Sun gave Java away for free for anyone to use, this includes the APIs. Google called Jonathan Schwartz as a witness, the former CEO of Sun. He testified that Google was indeed free to use Java’s APIs.

Had Oracle won, the trial would have moved on to another phase with this same jury, to determine damages.

More to come.

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: We dare you to oversleep with Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson’s new motivational alarm clock app



See original article here:

Google won its lawsuit against Oracle

The omnichannel customer experience is poised to take off in regulated industries

| May 26, 2016 | 0 Comments




 The omnichannel customer experience is nothing new, especially in the consumer and retail industries. Many companies and brands are using data and automation technologies to engage seamlessly with their customers at any time and place and across any device. At the same time, omnichannel doesn’t mean digitizing every aspect of the customer journey without regard to which channel is… Read More


See the original article here: 

The omnichannel customer experience is poised to take off in regulated industries

‘Shark Tank’ investor Daymond John says 3 things set billionaires apart

| May 26, 2016 | 0 Comments



Shark Tank” investor and entrepreneur Daymond John was broke with a $40 budget when he started growing FUBU.

Today, FUBU has earned over $6 billion in global sales, and John — with an estimated net worth of $250 million — has been around his fair share of wealthy individuals and entrepreneurs who have founded multi-million dollar companies.

On a recent podcast, host and business coach Lewis Howes asked John what separates billionaires from the rest of the crowd.

It boils down to three things, John said:

1. They’re as frugal as possible when launching a business.

“When your back is up against the wall and you have no other way to advance or create relationships and you can’t buy anybody — you can’t buy things to help you — you start to become creative,” John tells Business Insider. “When you become creative, that’s when you think outside the box — and that’s utilizing the power of broke.”

John went from cash-strapped to tremendously successful, which he details in his new book, “The Power of Broke,” but he refuses to abandon the “broke mindset.” In fact, he says many billionaires thrive by sticking to this mentality.

“The billionaires I’ve seen use the power of broke,” he told Howes on “The School of Greatness” podcast. “They may spend a billion dollars on a party, because that’s a party. But they are very disciplined and they won’t spend that on launching a company — they’ll act like they don’t have anything.”

2. They write everything down.

“We’re in this day and age where people are typing into their smartphones,” John told Howes. Billionaires “physically write down everything. I remember one of them said to me, ‘The dullest pencil will always remember more than the sharpest mind.'”

John isn’t the only one who’s picked up on this success habit. Virgin Group’s billionaire founder Richard Branson, who happens to be a note-taking connoisseur, attributes some of his most successful companies to the simple act of jotting things down.

3. They think big.

Billionaires “think purely on a global scale,” John explained. “We’ll sit there and say, ‘How many people can I get to walk by my service place in Manhattan?’ And they’ll sit there and say, ‘How many cars are in the world? How much exhaust comes out of them?’ They’re really thinking like that. That’s how they are.”

SEE ALSO: ‘Shark Tank’ entrepreneur Daymond John explains why being broke was key to his success

Join the conversation about this story »

NOW WATCH: These businesses profit off your laziness



See the original post: 

‘Shark Tank’ investor Daymond John says 3 things set billionaires apart

How to Become Part of an Industry Disruption Before It’s Too Late

| May 26, 2016 | 0 Comments




Everyone wants to be a disruptor. Know how to spot a market change and you’ll be the one changing your industry

See original article:  

How to Become Part of an Industry Disruption Before It’s Too Late

Death on the Appalachian Trail: A Hiker’s Last Words

| May 26, 2016 | 0 Comments




“When you find my body, please call my husband George and my daughter Kerry,” Geraldine Largay, 66, wrote in her diary after she got lost in Maine.

Visit link:

Death on the Appalachian Trail: A Hiker’s Last Words

5 Innovative Consultants That Are Changing the World

| May 26, 2016 | 0 Comments




In a world where ideas are everything, these consultants are turning the way things are done completely upside down.

This article:  

5 Innovative Consultants That Are Changing the World

Tristan Harris, ex-Googler, criticizes app design like slot machines

| May 26, 2016 | 0 Comments



Redirect for broken link is here.

Join the conversation about this story »



View original post here – 

Tristan Harris, ex-Googler, criticizes app design like slot machines

Baylor Fires Football Coach Art Briles and Demotes President Ken Starr

| May 26, 2016 | 0 Comments




The decision comes after Baylor’s board of regents received the results of an investigation that was expected to fault the university’s handling of several sexual assault accusations involving Baylor football players.

Originally from:

Baylor Fires Football Coach Art Briles and Demotes President Ken Starr

Airbnb + HotelTonight = new startup Overnight

| May 26, 2016 | 0 Comments




 Need a place to crash last-minute but don’t want to pay for a pricey, cookie-cutter hotel? Overnight can hook you up with a local to stay with right away. Request a room and Overnight averages just 45 seconds until you get a response, and in LA, the startup says its spots are 23% cheaper than equivalent dwellings on HotelTonight.
Overnight is Airbnb for people who don’t plan ahead. Read More


Excerpt from: 

Airbnb + HotelTonight = new startup Overnight

Couple celebrate £1million lottery win by splashing out £159 on a new lawnmower

| May 26, 2016 | 0 Comments




Geoff Coombes and his wife, Judith, who have been married for 42 years, were relaxing at their home in Southampton when they heard about their £1million win on the Lotto Millionaire Raffle.

Read original article: 

Couple celebrate £1million lottery win by splashing out £159 on a new lawnmower

This is the oldest tech still used by the US government

| May 26, 2016 | 0 Comments



The US government has some catching up to do in the technology department.

Agencies across the government reported using tech in some cases that was more than 50 years old, according to a new report from the Government Accountability Office. 

That means everything from America’s nukes still being controlled by 8-inch floppy disks to taxes being tracked with a programming language designed in the 1950s.

The title of the report on the government’s information technology infrastructure — “Federal Agencies Need to Address Aging Legacy Systems” — is what we’d classify as an understatement.

Here are the oldest systems GAO found were still in use, along with the plan (if any) of when they’ll be updated.

SEE ALSO: America’s nukes are still controlled by 8-inch floppy disks

The oldest tech still in use was found in the Treasury Department, which was using a 56-year-old programming language called assembly language code.

The code is difficult to write and maintain, as the report notes.

It’s being used for maintaining everyone’s Individual Master File, the data source for taxes, refunds, and other updates.

And there’s no solid plan to replace it.

Treasury also reported that same 56-year-old technology being used to track business taxes as well.

Tax data for individual business income is tracked in Treasury’s Business Master File, also written in assembly language code.

It’s operating on an IBM mainframe, a giant computer that has less power than the smartphone in your pocket.

There are no definite plans to upgrade.

The Cold War may be over, but America’s nukes are still using that era’s technology.

The Pentagon’s Strategic Automated Command and Control System is running on an IBM Series/1 computer from the 1970s, and it uses 8-inch floppy disks.

The system controls the operational functions of US nuclear forces, such as intercontinental ballistic missiles, bombers, and tanker support. In the past, the Air Force has noted that since the tech is so old, it can’t be hacked.

Still, the Pentagon is planning to update data storage, desktop and portable terminals, among other things, which is scheduled to complete by the end of the 2017 fiscal year.

See the rest of the story at Business Insider


Continued here: 

This is the oldest tech still used by the US government

Adobe is bringing content-aware cropping to Photoshop

| May 26, 2016 | 0 Comments




 If you’ve every tried to crop a photo (and in the age of Instagram, who hasn’t?) or simply adjust the horizon line, you know how hard it can be to find just the right crop that allows you to focus on what you want to highlight in a picture without cutting other important parts out of it or leaving you with white edges. If you’re a Photoshop user, you may soon have to maker… Read More


Original post: 

Adobe is bringing content-aware cropping to Photoshop

14 innovative features in Volvo’s latest electric SUV

| May 26, 2016 | 0 Comments



Volvo’s XC90 is not your average car. 

The company’s latest luxury SUV is beautifully designed and chock full of innovative details, including tons of high-tech safety features and a number of handy conveniance functions. 

Recently, I had the chance to take a 2016 XC90 T8, which is Volvo’s plug-in hybrid version of this car, on a drive upstate. While I only had the car for three days, I quickly fell in love. 

Here are the 14 features that impressed me the most.

SEE ALSO: The most expensive Volvo of all time is here

1. Instead of a push button for you to start/stop the engine, you start the car by simply keeping your foot on the brake and turning the engine knob to “start.”

The first thing you will notice once you start the car is how incredibly quiet it is because of the electric motor. 

2. To park, you simply hit the “P” button in the center console.

3. Apple CarPlay is easy to set up in the car and makes accessing all of your iPhone’s data while driving incredibly easy.

Volvo’s 9-inch touchscreen display basically turns into a giant iPhone when using CarPlay. There’s even a “Home” button that takes you back to your start screen where all of your controls are. 

See the rest of the story at Business Insider


Read article here:

14 innovative features in Volvo’s latest electric SUV

ISIS recruiter Sally Jones tweets, ‘You are pathetic England’

| May 26, 2016 | 0 Comments




ISIS recruiter Sally Jones, 47, wrote on Twitter: ‘You all scare so easily… it only takes a few tweets, because you are pathetic England. But b4 I go, I just wanna say… have a nice summer.’

View post:

ISIS recruiter Sally Jones tweets, ‘You are pathetic England’

Twitch launches Clips so gamers can quickly share short videos of their favorite moments

| May 26, 2016 | 0 Comments




 Live streaming platform and gamer community Twitch is today launching a new feature that it hopes will help spread its content further afield. The company has now debuted Clips, a feature that lets website viewers quickly and easily clip a 30-second portion video from others’ live streams. These clips automatically include links back to the original live broadcaster, which eliminates… Read More


See the original article here:

Twitch launches Clips so gamers can quickly share short videos of their favorite moments

UK weather to see some sun this weekend but Bank Holiday Monday could be a washout

| May 26, 2016 | 0 Comments




The country is expecting to enjoy above-average temperatures of 20C this weekend but showers threaten to dampen the South West on Saturday and Monday could be a washout in the East.

Link to article:  

UK weather to see some sun this weekend but Bank Holiday Monday could be a washout

The Queen Elizabeth celebrates 300 years of the Royal Artillery

| May 26, 2016 | 0 Comments




Her Majesty has been Captain General of the Royal Artillery since 1952 and attended their tricentenary celebrations at their headquarters today where they performed a ride and drive past.

See the original post:

The Queen Elizabeth celebrates 300 years of the Royal Artillery

Blake Shelton buys ex Miranda Lambert’s Pink Pistol boutique

| May 26, 2016 | 0 Comments




Miranda Lambert’s Pink Pistol boutique in Tishomingo, Oklahoma has closed its doors permanently after three years in operation.

View the original here:

Blake Shelton buys ex Miranda Lambert’s Pink Pistol boutique

Queen of the Gipsies who left 52 grandchildren when she died with big send off

| May 26, 2016 | 0 Comments




Ruby Pearl Marshall died following heart and kidney problems on May 12 and hundreds payed their respects at her funeral today in Merthyr, Wales.

Read original article: 

Queen of the Gipsies who left 52 grandchildren when she died with big send off

Team Brexit is winning the financial race to the EU referendum after raising more than TWICE as…

| May 26, 2016 | 0 Comments




Groups backing a Leave vote raked in almost two-and-a-half times as much between April 22 and May 12 according to donation and loan declarations published by the Electoral Commission.

See more here: 

Team Brexit is winning the financial race to the EU referendum after raising more than TWICE as…

Dish ships the HopperGo, a tiny little cloud player for TV on the run

| May 26, 2016 | 0 Comments




 Originally announced at CES in January, the minuscule HopperGo is a 64GB USB drive with a built in wireless access point. The little device connects to your Dish Hopper 3 or Hopper 2 – essentially Dish’s DVR – and sucks down up to 100 hours of TV. You can then unplug the little bugger and watch for four hours on one charge through the Dish Anywhere app. When I first pulled… Read More


Source article: 

Dish ships the HopperGo, a tiny little cloud player for TV on the run

Secret sky gardens of New York City revealed in stunning aerial pictures

| May 26, 2016 | 0 Comments




From street level, few visitors to the Big Apple would realize that many New Yorkers are secret gardeners as apartment complexes in Manhattan tend not to have much space on the ground to cultivate plants.

See the original post: 

Secret sky gardens of New York City revealed in stunning aerial pictures

WWII photos reveal kamikaze attacks on Allied aircraft carriers in the Pacific

| May 26, 2016 | 0 Comments




The photographs of the Royal Navy Pacific Fleet include the flaming wreckage of Japanese planes that were deliberately flown into the superstructure of ships by suicidal pilots.

View article:  

WWII photos reveal kamikaze attacks on Allied aircraft carriers in the Pacific

Paultons Park Velociraptor rollercoaster trapped 45ft in the air for 40 minutes

| May 26, 2016 | 0 Comments




Around 15 passengers were stuck for 40 minutes near the top of the new Velociraptor ride at Paultons Park near Romsey, Hampshire, after witnesses described hearing a ‘hissing sound’.

Originally posted here:  

Paultons Park Velociraptor rollercoaster trapped 45ft in the air for 40 minutes

Nintendo’s first game Miitomo is turning into a ghost town

| May 26, 2016 | 0 Comments




 Nintendo’s first smartphone application – the social game called Miitomo, which allows avatars to interact in a virtual world – may already be in decline, according to a new report. Following its launch earlier this year, it seemed that Miitomo found immediate success, shooting to the top of both the iOS and Android app stores. Nintendo also claimed in May that the… Read More


See original article here:  

Nintendo’s first game Miitomo is turning into a ghost town