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Some Uber users are claiming their accounts have been hacked

| March 30, 2015 | 0 Comments



Some Uber users are reporting that they’re being charged for rides they didn’t take, according to Motherboard, which reported on Monday that anonymous third parties have been able to access certain Uber accounts. 

Since credit cards are automatically linked to your Uber account, these intruders have been able to order rides without the account holder’s permission, according to the report. 

“I got a notification on my phone from Uber saying ‘your taxi was on its way/it arrived’ etc., but thought it must be a glitch of the app,” one Uber customer told Motherboard.

 

Some customers say they’ve received no response from the company.

Others say they have been locked out of their Uber accounts after the person who hacked their account changed the email address or password associated with the account.

Other customers tell Motherboard they’ve been refunded by the company for the fraudulent rides.

An Uber spokesperson said the company found “no evidence of a breach” in the following statement to Business Insider:

We investigated and found no evidence of a breach. Attempting to fraudulently access or sell accounts is illegal and we notified the authorities about this report. This is a good opportunity to remind people to use strong and unique usernames and passwords and to avoid reusing the same credentials across multiple sites and services.

 This follows a previous report from Motherboard that said Uber credentials are being hawked on online marketplaces such as AlphaBay for as little as $1 a pop. While the login credentials are available for purchase on this marketplace, credit card numbers are not listed on the accounts beyond the last four digits. 

The dark web is a hot bed for such illegal transactions. Former dark web black markets such as Silk Road were known to offer goods like weapons and drugs. Now, following Silk Road’s demise, entrants like AlphaBay have percolated. 

Motherboard says it obtained the usernames and passwords of a few accounts for sale and confirmed that the information was correct. It’s unclear how the website obtained these records.

“It’s terrifying that this information is out there,” one user whose information was for sale told Motherboard. 

SEE ALSO: 19 Uber interview questions you don’t want to be asked

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NOW WATCH: This is what happens to your brain and body when you check your phone before bed







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Some Uber users are claiming their accounts have been hacked

The crazy orbital mechanics you need to rendezvous with the International Space Station

| March 30, 2015 | 0 Comments



Imagine being chased by a 925,000 pound machine traveling at 17,500 miles per hour.

That’s what’s happens when astronauts dock with the International Space Station. Surprisingly though, the process can take a lot longer than you’d think.

Although a rocket can transport astronauts into space in less than 10 minutes, it takes hours, and even days, to rendezvous with the International Space Station.

Case in point: On Friday, March 27, astronaut Scott Kelly and cosmonauts Gennady Padalka and Mikhail Kornienko launched at 3:42 pm ET but were crammed inside of their Soyuz spacecraft for another 6 hours. They didn’t dock with the ISS until 9:36 pm ET that evening.

So why does it take so long to reach the ISS? After all, once you’re already in space, the ISS is only miles away. And Earth’s gravitational pull is weak, which means a little power can take you a long way.

Despite being relatively close, the ISS is traveling at more than 17,000 miles per hour in a circular orbit around Earth. Anything moving that fast, whether in space or on the ground, is going to be hard to catch.

As it turns out, the way you catch the ISS is counterintuitive: You actually let it catch you.

American engineer Destin Sandlin (who also founded the YouTube channel “Smarter Every Day”) spoke with NASA astronauts about exactly how a Soyuz spacecraft, like the one Scott Kelly, Gennady Padalka, and Mikhail Kornienko flew on Friday, docks with the ISS.

Here are the crazy steps they took:

First, once they reach space, the astronauts fire the rockets parallel to Earth to get their spacecraft into orbit:

Next, they need to get farther away from Earth and closer to the ISS.

They can’t just point their spacecraft away from Earth and gun the engines, though, because that would quickly take them out of range of the ISS and into deep-space.

Instead, they transfer from a lower circular orbit to a higher circular orbit by completing what is called a Hohmann Transfer. To do this, the spacecraft burns its engines twice: Once to boost the spacecraft farther into space and a again to keep the spacecraft in that second, circular orbit:

Because every spacecraft and engine system is different, the astronauts can’t predict exactly where that second circular orbit will be in space.

“We could be a little high, we could be a little low, a little fast, a little slow,” NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman told Sandlin.

So, the astronauts fire a series of short, brief, correction burns (shown below) to get them at just the right place in orbit where they’re completing one orbit around Earth every 86 minutes — 4 minutes faster than the ISS. That small timing difference is key!

The final step is to perform a second Hohmann Transfer right as the spacecraft surpasses the ISS. That last transfer gets it to 250 miles above the surface, just out in front of the ISS. The pursuer has suddenly become the pursued.

At that point, the astronauts pull a U-turn in space, fire the spacecraft’s engines one last time to slow down and allow the ISS to catch up:

After that, it’s just a matter of lining the two spacecrafts up:

Check out the full video below:

 

LEARN MORE: These twin brothers are about to help NASA make history

SEE ALSO: NASA is about to conduct the most complex experiment on the space station ever

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NOW WATCH: NASA just tested its biggest booster rocket ever that will help astronauts get to Mars







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The crazy orbital mechanics you need to rendezvous with the International Space Station

Somber new clue in Germanwings crash investigation

| March 30, 2015 | 0 Comments




German prosecutors’ latest remarks appear to bolster mounting evidence that Andreas Lubitz battled severe depression


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Somber new clue in Germanwings crash investigation

"What could have destabilized Andreas Lubitz?"

| March 30, 2015 | 0 Comments




European investigators claw for clues as to what could have driven Germanwings co-pilot Andreas Lubitz to fly himself and 149 others into a mountain


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"What could have destabilized Andreas Lubitz?"

Syrian President Assad defends regime’s role in mass refugee crisis

| March 30, 2015 | 0 Comments




With the civil war now in its fifth year, nearly four million people have fled Syria. Many hope for safety in Turkey, Jordan and Lebanon. In a wide-ranging 60 Minutes interview, Assad told Charlie Rose why he believes so many are racing to get out. Syrian TV shot the interview at the regime’s request for security reasons.


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Syrian President Assad defends regime’s role in mass refugee crisis

Battle for massive and prized Bahia Emerald

| March 30, 2015 | 0 Comments




One of the largest and rarest gems in the world is at the center of a court battle in Los Angeles. Ben Tracy reports on how several people are staking a claim on the 840-pound emerald, but they’re up against the entire country of Brazil.


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Battle for massive and prized Bahia Emerald

Laurence Fishburne’s mother claims she is being evicted and son won’t give her ‘a penny’

| March 30, 2015 | 0 Comments




Laurence Fishburne’s mother claims she is being evicted and cannot reach her son.

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Laurence Fishburne’s mother claims she is being evicted and son won’t give her ‘a penny’

New challenges as Iran nuclear deadline looms

| March 30, 2015 | 0 Comments




Secretary of State John Kerry and negotiators from other world powers are making a final push to complete a nuclear deal with Iran. Talks are deadlocked, and they face a Tuesday deadline. Margaret Brennan reports on a new sticking point that has emerged.


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New challenges as Iran nuclear deadline looms

Black box captures Germanwings captain’s pleas outside cockpit

| March 30, 2015 | 0 Comments




New disclosures over the weekend show Germanwings Flight 9525 co-pilot Andreas Lubitz apparently had a series of psychological and physical illnesses, including severe depression and an eye problem. Allen Pizzey reports from Montabaur, Germany, Lubitz’s hometown.


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Black box captures Germanwings captain’s pleas outside cockpit

Dolly Parton details her marriage to Carl Thomas Dean

| March 30, 2015 | 0 Comments




What’s Dolly Parton’s secret to a happy marriage?

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Dolly Parton details her marriage to Carl Thomas Dean

Roma Downey on ‘A.D.’ miniseries: ‘People are hungry for stories of faith’

| March 30, 2015 | 0 Comments




Roma Downey and Mark Burnett ‘s spiritual journey through biblical history continues on Easter Sunday when NBC premieres “A.D. The Bible Continues.” 

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Roma Downey on ‘A.D.’ miniseries: ‘People are hungry for stories of faith’

What If San Andreas Starred Superman Instead of The Rock?

| March 30, 2015 | 0 Comments




Imagine if Superman were there to save everyone from this natural disaster in San Andreas? Imagine no more, because here’s a mash-up of Supermandreas.

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What If San Andreas Starred Superman Instead of The Rock?

Carrie Underwood shares first picture of son Isaiah’s face

| March 30, 2015 | 0 Comments




Apparently, Carrie Underwood‘s baby boy is following in dad Mike Fisher’s footsteps.

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Carrie Underwood shares first picture of son Isaiah’s face

Fat grafting technique improves results of breast augmentation

| March 30, 2015 | 0 Comments




In women undergoing breast augmentation, a technique using transplantation of a small amount of the patient’s own fat cells can produce better cosmetic outcomes, reports a study. In particular, the fat grafting technique can achieve a more natural-appearing cleavage — avoiding the “separated breasts” appearance that can occur after breast augmentation.

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Fat grafting technique improves results of breast augmentation

11th hour hurdles for Iran nuclear deal

| March 30, 2015 | 0 Comments




With pressure on in Switzerland for U.S.-led talks to bear fruit by Tuesday deadline, there are signs of backsliding


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11th hour hurdles for Iran nuclear deal

This is the Best Online Tax Software

| March 30, 2015 | 0 Comments




After more than 30 hours of testing, The Wirecutter found the least painful way to file your taxes online.




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This is the Best Online Tax Software

Benchmarking’s Fatal Mistake

| March 30, 2015 | 0 Comments




Steve Cadigan provides tips for the right ways to learn from great companies!




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Benchmarking’s Fatal Mistake

The Incomparable Benefits of Self-Financing

| March 30, 2015 | 0 Comments




Jane Wurwand, co-founder of Dermalogica, explains the ways that self-financing your business can pay off.




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The Incomparable Benefits of Self-Financing

Shortest DNA sequences reveal insights into the world’s tallest trees

| March 30, 2015 | 0 Comments




Coast redwoods (Sequioa sempervirens), famous for being the world’s tallest trees, are also unusual for their ability to reproduce clonally from stumps, fallen logs, and roots. Researchers have outlined a new method to identify clonal lineages and study clonal diversity across the species’ geographic range. Genetic data produced from this protocol could help guide sustainable forest management of commercial young-growth forests and also improve efforts to preserve ancient redwood populations.

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Shortest DNA sequences reveal insights into the world’s tallest trees

‘Google Maps’ for the body: A biomedical revolution

| March 30, 2015 | 0 Comments




Scientists are using previously top-secret technology to zoom through the human body down to the level of a single cell. Scientists are also using cutting-edge microtome and MRI technology to examine how movement and weight bearing affects the movement of molecules within joints, exploring the relationship between blood, bone, lymphatics and muscle.

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‘Google Maps’ for the body: A biomedical revolution

‘Atomic chicken-wire’ is key to faster DNA sequencing

| March 30, 2015 | 0 Comments




An unusual and very exciting form of carbon — that can be created by drawing on paper — looks to hold the key to real-time, high throughput DNA sequencing, a technique that would revolutionize medical research and testing.

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‘Atomic chicken-wire’ is key to faster DNA sequencing

Equatorial fish babies in hot water

| March 30, 2015 | 0 Comments




Rising ocean temperatures slow the development of baby fish around the equator, scientists have found, raising concerns about the impact of global warming on fish and fisheries in the tropics.

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Equatorial fish babies in hot water

Only one of 32 hockey helmets tested earn 3-star rating

| March 30, 2015 | 0 Comments




The five-star ratings of hockey helmets, judging their abilities to help prevent concussions, have been released by experts. The findings so far: Only one of 32 tested hockey helmets earned three stars with all other models faring worse in laboratory impact tests.

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Only one of 32 hockey helmets tested earn 3-star rating

Bitter chocolate: Illegal cocoa farms threaten Ivory coast primates

| March 30, 2015 | 0 Comments




Researchers surveying for endangered primates in national parks and forest reserves of Ivory Coast found, to their surprise, that most of these protected areas had been turned into illegal cocoa farms, a new study reports.

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Bitter chocolate: Illegal cocoa farms threaten Ivory coast primates

Rapper Ludacris, model Chrissy Teigen to host Billboard Music Awards on May 17 in Las Vegas

| March 30, 2015 | 0 Comments




Ludacris and Chrissy Teigen will host the 2015 Billboard Music Awards in May.

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Rapper Ludacris, model Chrissy Teigen to host Billboard Music Awards on May 17 in Las Vegas

What You Need to Know to Expand Your Business Internationally

| March 30, 2015 | 0 Comments




How 99Designs founder Patrick Llewellyn turned his small business into a global brand.




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What You Need to Know to Expand Your Business Internationally

New Jurassic World Footage Gives Us Best Look Yet At Terrifying Dino Threat

| March 30, 2015 | 0 Comments




Jurassic World is preparing to unveil its new genetically enhance dinosaur in theaters starting June 12, but so far the “clever girl” has been rather shy. Now a new Jurassic World TV spot has dropped online, revealing our best look yet at the new threat terrorizing Isla Nublar.

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New Jurassic World Footage Gives Us Best Look Yet At Terrifying Dino Threat

5 Ways to Vary Your Online Ads to Compel Consumers

| March 30, 2015 | 0 Comments




Five areas where small variations can have a big impact on ad effectiveness.




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5 Ways to Vary Your Online Ads to Compel Consumers

Def Leppard frontman Joe Elliott isn’t ‘Foolin’ when he says rock for all ages

| March 30, 2015 | 0 Comments




Def Leppard frontman Joe Elliott understands that the working life of a rock band no longer comes with an expiration date.

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Def Leppard frontman Joe Elliott isn’t ‘Foolin’ when he says rock for all ages

If You Want to Succeed, Build Up Good Karma, Then Add a Little Luck

| March 30, 2015 | 0 Comments




Scooter Braun, founder of SB Projects, talks about the benefits of helping others and giving back, plus the undeniable necessity of luck.




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If You Want to Succeed, Build Up Good Karma, Then Add a Little Luck